Wednesday, 8 March 2017

After the Rain



I visited this structure today.      

It is a sturdy and strong packhorse bridge which dates from the 14th Century.       Last year  I posted about it here.

It didn't look quite so beautiful and tranquil today because we have endured lots of rain in recent weeks.    Someone had cleared a lot of debris to keep the stream flowing.     Unfortunately they had left it stacked to one side so it was difficult to get any decent photographs.



It looked as though it was straddling a stream of weak tea, thanks to all the mud.


The pile of debris is to the left of this photograph.


This photo gives you some idea of just how small the bridge is.    Just wide enough for a packhorse to be led across.     Amazing to think of how many hooves and feet have walked across over the centuries.

Weak tea, debris, rain -  none of that matters.   It is a delightful and very beautiful bit of history and I thoroughly enjoyed my stroll across it.


This church is just to the right - everywhere was muddy and dank but nevertheless, it was nice to visit the village again.

18 comments:

  1. That is the coolest bridge ever. Yes, imagine how many hooves have crossed.

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    1. Hello Deb, Isn't it beautiful. Little could those builders and masons have guessed at how long it would endure and how widely it is admired!

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  2. I was just imagining the small bridge in a drawing by you, dear friend...one like the "map of little bunting". It would be a great way to pay tribute to it's history. You could add it to your long "to do list".

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    1. Hello Meggie, That list is an enormously long one - rather like your own! Still, it makes life fun, having plenty of projects to enjoy.

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  3. How amazing that that bridge is still there, centuries after it was built.
    Margaret P

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    1. Hello Margaret, I am so glad that it has survived - quite remarkable, really. It is just as well that it is down a country lane.

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  4. I love seeing these unique features in your village!

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    1. Hello Christine, It's in a small village close to my previous home - perhaps 15-20 minutes by car. I wish it were here, though!

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  5. That bridge is so interesting. I see another bridge next to it takes all the traffic now. Nice that the old one wasn't removed.

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    1. Hello Marcia, It is little short of a miracle that it has survived - luckily it is protected these days. It is probably only about two and a half feet wide, quite tiny.

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  6. It is a lovely bridge...still so strong and sturdy looking after all those years. I wonder if any of the horses ever balked at the crossing. Most of the horses we had over the years didn't care for bridges.

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    1. Hello chip, I'm so glad you like it. I wouldn't be at all surprised - and I bet it was treacherous in icy weather!

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  7. We've got a few ancient bridges around us. As you say it is amazing how many hooves have passed over them and amazing work back then on obviously a very effective road system

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    1. Hello Linda, The salt traders used the bridge as they left the coast and travelled far and wide. Just a mile up the road there was a Gilbertine Priory, long since gone as has the village it was in. Thank goodness the bridge survived.

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  8. Wonderful, to have so many lovely spots, to visit!!! Lucky you!

    And wise you, for seeking them out and visiting them.

    Luna Crone

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    1. It is a passion of mine, Luna. I love to go and visit these places/buildings/structures and just stand and stare, try to really feel the place and absorb some of the history.

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  9. Gorgeous images Elaine. The bridge is so picturesque. Great to see it at a different time of year, I remember it from your previous post :)

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    1. Hello Prunella, I'm glad you enjoyed it. Some places are worth re-visiting, the atmosphere was very different on that day.

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